• The Book

    When this book was conceived, our first instinct was to create a comprehensive com- parison between Clojure and its host language, Java. After further reflection, we reached the conclusion that such an approach would be disingenuous at best, and disastrous at worst. Granted, some points of comparison can’t be avoided, but Java is very different …

  • The Authors

    The Joy of Clojure was written by Michael Fogus and Chris Houser, two active members of the burgeoning Clojure community and active contributors to the language itself. Fogus is a member of Clojure/core with experience in distributed simulation, machine vision, and expert systems. He can be found on the Internet at: Twitter Blog Tumblog Some …

  • The Language

    Clojure is a dialect of Lisp supporting1 concurrent software development using functional programming techniques, and like the Lisp described in “Beating the Averages,” provides an environment conducive to agility. Clojure fosters agility in ways that many popular programming languages can’t. Many programming languages are bewitched with most or all of the following: Verbosity Essential boilerplate …

  • The Bibliography

    Miscellaneous resources Abadi, Martin, and Luca Cardelli. 1996. A Theory of Objects New York: Springer. Although not a mathematical concept, object-oriented programming has obtained rigor with this gem. Abelson, Harold, and Gerald Jay Sussman. 1988. “Lisp: A Language for Stratified Design.” AI Memo (MIT) 986. ———. 1996. Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs Cambridge, MA: …